a man feeling stressed in need of heroin rehab

Heroin is an opioid made from the naturally occurring sap found in opium poppies combined with ammonia, fentanyl, chloroform, strychnine, and other hazardous materials. Heroin and other opioids work by binding themselves to pain receptors in the nervous system and brain, blocking pain signals to the rest of the body. Legal opioids like morphine, methadone, fentanyl, hydrocodone, and codeine provide temporary relief from pain. A medical detox program is the easiest way to slowly remove heroin from your system. Contact Solution Based Treatment and Detox by calling 833.999.1941 if you need help managing your heroin addiction.

Why do People Use Heroin?

People use heroin because they are desperate for relief. Heroin is a Schedule I drug under the United States Controlled Substances Act. It profoundly impairs the social, psychological, and occupational functioning of the user. Heroin has no approved medical use in Murrietta–or anywhere in the US–but it is one of the most widely abused drugs in the country. Treatment options for overcoming a heroin addiction include:

Many heroin users turn to the chemical in search of the rush of temporary relief from the pain and daily anguish caused by severe past trauma (including rape, abuse, violence, etc.) and dual diagnosis. Heroin users report feelings of intense euphoria and a complete, temporary absence of all psychological distress and physical pain upon administering the drug. These effects are similar to those experienced when using drugs like fentanyl, morphine, hydrocodone, and carfentanil. They include:

  • Semiconsciousness (nodding out)
  • Avoiding friends and loved ones
  • Disorientation
  • Severe itching and picking at the skin
  • Damaged veins and tissue
  • Slurred speech
  • Constipation and stomach cramps
  • Heart and lung infections
  • Sexual dysfunction
  • Hallucinations
  • Liver and kidney disease 
  • AIDS and Hepatitis C
  • Collapsed veins
  • Bacterial infections
  • Respiratory distress
  • Constricted, pinpoint pupils

Heroin Withdrawal Symptoms

Once the opioid-induced euphoria is gone, the user is left despondent, vomiting, and desperate for more dope. Users begin to experience symptoms of withdrawal a few hours after sustained use. After a long period of heroin use, withdrawal can lead to serious medical complications. That’s why quitting “cold turkey” is dangerous. The drug detox program at Solution Based Treatment helps clients experiencing severe withdrawal symptoms. Some of the most common withdrawal symptoms from using heroin include:

  • Hostility toward others
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Abdominal pain
  • Sweating
  • Extreme pain in muscles and bones
  • Uncontrollable bouts of sadness and crying
  • Shaking
  • Agitation
  • Insomnia
  • Diarrhea
  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Fever
  • Intense cravings

Substance use disorder (SUD) is lonely and desolate; when left untreated, people with SUD are unable to rebuild the coping mechanisms they need in order to live meaningful lives. People who depend on heroin can sometimes avoid an overdose, but the effects of heroin will eventually take their toll. Enrolling in a medical detox program is the safest way to detox from heroin and avoid many of the dangerous, uncomfortable symptoms of withdrawal. The heroin addiction treatment at Solution Based Treatment & Detox provides options for people who are tired of letting heroin control their existence.

Recovery Activities

Even after participating in individual therapy, family therapy, and peer support groups, readjusting to daily life may be challenging. That’s why we offer recovery activities, including:

We also encourage our clients to join an exercise program. Aftercare programs, meditation, and mindfulness are other great recovery activities. When our clients complete treatment, we provide individualized discharge plans to help continue their ongoing recovery.

Don’t hesitate. Call Solution Based Treatment & Detox at 833.999.1941 if you or a loved one live with heroin addiction and get on the road to recovery today.